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The condensed directions: Read the cue, react to the cue. There's no right answer, no research required. I cite sources where applicable but it's all about coming up with creative answers. Winners are picked in a week.

The number one rule? Have FUN!!!

05/23 - I'll be naming final winners this week!

Monday, January 18, 2010

I Have a Dream

In the News: This category features news-related prompts.
"I have a dream..."
January 18th is "Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. When he delivered his famous "I Have A Dream" speech in 1963, he was addressing equality for all people. Now, in 2010, what kind of "dream" do we need to rally behind?

Source

We Have A Winner!! 01/25/10
There is a common misinterpretation that Martin Luther King's speech lobbied for equal rights for all. In reality, all but the first "I have a dream" stanza, and the build up to those beautiful passages, specifically sites brotherhood and equality between whites and blacks/ Negros. What should we rally behind then? The essence of his speech. The underlying prose of equality. As long as a group of people are systematically devalued by a characteristic such as race, gender, age, religion, sexual preference, etc, his speech is very much relevant. And humanity will have something to rally behind.
Winner: Heather
Reason: Great responses on this but the win goes to Heather for pointing out the common misconception (including my own) about his speech and for applying it more widely.

6 comments:

christine said...

It hasn't changed, has it? We're getting there, slowy but surely, but it is still a dream. Look at Native Americans still suffering, for example, or black people in certain states.

SOL said...

King's dream speech is as relevant today as it was in 1963. He speaks of a universal dream for humanity rising above differences and truly loving and accepting each other as brothers and sisters. His dream was an amazing vision and worth working towards for as long as it takes to get there.

C. Beth said...

I have a dream, in 2010.
Start with respect between all men.
Add kindness, too,
In all we do.
We'll get a whole lot more done then.

2cats said...

I was in a college class on this day many years ago. We heard/saw the speech. We then had discussion about the speech. The discussion turned lively.
The discussion ended when I punched a guy in the face. True story. He said some very hateful things. Everyone in the class was dumbfounded and did not know how to react.
The class grew quiet and he continued to spew his vomit of hate. I finally turned around and not so politely told him to shut up. He had some equally impolite things to say about me.
What could I do? I had to shut him up. I mean really I did. So I punched him in the face.
He got quiet. The class ended. I felt very good.
I believe we are entitled to our opinions but his were hateful and outrageous. So I punched him.
Not exactly what Dr. King wanted but it served my purpose.

Heather said...

There is a common misinterpretation that Martin Luther King's speech lobbied for equal rights for all. In reality, all but the first "I have a dream" stanza, and the build up to those beautiful passages, specifically sites brotherhood and equality between whites and blacks/ Negros. What should we rally behind then? The essence of his speech. The underlying prose of equality. As long as a group of people are systematically devalued by a characteristic such as race, gender, age, religion, sexual preference, etc, his speech is very much relevant. And humanity will have something to rally behind.

Bethany said...

I have a dream that some day no child will go to sleep with only dreams of dinner to sustain them through the long night. I dream of a day when mankind stops using God as a reason for war and starts using God as a reason for peace. I dream of a world where no one dies because they had the misfortune of being born in a social class or country that does not have ready access to quality health care. I dream of a time when we realize that our basic rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness also include dignity, respect, freedom from persecution, and equal access. I dream of a day when those with disabilities are truly included in society and are seen not for their disabilities but for their abilities. I dream of a day when we no longer have to celebrate having an African American president or a Hispanic supreme court justice because these things will be common and expected. I dream of a day when we can look into the eyes of our children and tell them with honesty and integrity that we have made the world a better place for them and that we have done the very best we could do to create a legacy we are proud to give them. I dream of a day when evil has no place to hide and what is hidden in the darkness is brought into the light. I dream of a day when it does not require the worst to bring out the best in humanity. I dream.

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